Categories
BLOG

how to win at deal or no deal

These guys figured out how to beat the “Deal or No Deal” arcade game

In the arcade game Deal or No Deal, based on the TV game show of the same name, you have to try to keep your eyes on fast-moving cartoon suitcases as they are shuffled on the display. These guys used their phones to videotape the shuffling in slow motion so they could keep track of the prize winning suitcase.

At the start of the game, 16 briefcases are shown open with their contents visible (points between one and 800). The cases are then closed and rapidly shuffled.

Normally, it is impossible to follow the case with the highest number of points, but these teenagers film the shuffling on their phones and then quickly review the footage in slow motion so that they can determine the position of the winning case.

Armed with this information they then proceed to select the correct case and make the optimum deal at the end.

The filmer writes: “The teenagers play a number of games, and then got their tickets counted which ran into the thousands. Finally, they trade their vouchers for a major prize.”

  • SHARE
  • TWEET
  • 24 COMMENTS
  • beating the system

Justifiably angry man hacks evil GE refrigerator

An anonymous hero created a website called GE Filtergate. The website describes how his GE refrigerator issued an ominous warning that he had seven days to install a new GE water filter before the refrigerator “disabled its own ice and water system. He examined the refrigerator and learned that the filter had an RFID chip:… READ THE REST

Gentleman arrested for using mice and hamsters to get free hotel rooms

Utah police say Ryan Sentelle State (37) scored free hotel rooms by releasing mice and hamsters in the room and then demanding a free room to compensate him for the horror of sharing a room with a rodent. From KUTV: State would point out feces left by the rodents, a probable cause statement says. Hotels… READ THE REST

Cheap phone rocker for boosting your daily step count

Aliexpress has lots of these little gadgets that rock a phone back-and-forth to fool the pedometer into thinking you are walking on a treadmill. They cost about $2. Why? “Some insurance companies in China allow people who consistently reach a certain daily step count to get discounted health insurance premiums,” writes Matthew Brennan. Chinese phone… READ THE REST

Become a machine learning aficionado with this training bundle

In the past few days, the U.S. Air Force rolled out new tools fueled by machine learning to help stem the spread of misinformation about COVID. Additionally, the Library of Congress has launched a project on how to use machine learning to better cross-reference all 170 million items in its overflowing archives. Every day, we… READ THE REST

This portable USB charger can get an Apple Watch back to full power on the go

The Apple Watch is a great addition to any tech arsenal–until it runs out of juice, that is. Then, you have to go about the process of recharging. Of course, the Apple Watch only recharges via wireless charging, meaning it can sometimes end up being pretty inconvenient to power up, especially if you’re out and… READ THE REST

28 essential items you’ll need to survive this winter

We’ve probably all been holding our breath about this for a while. And now that it’s here, we can start getting used to the idea that this winter will be unlike any before it. With COVID’s impact on the holidays, we’re all expecting some big changes this time around. However, Mother Nature isn’t really all… READ THE REST

Read the rules you agree to by using this website in our Terms of Service.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Boing Boing uses cookies and analytics trackers, and is supported by advertising, merchandise sales and affiliate links. Read about what we do with the data we gather in our Privacy Policy.

Who will be eaten first? Our forum rules are detailed in the Community Guidelines.

Boing Boing is published under a Creative Commons license except where otherwise noted.

https://youtu.be/ZRhzq7z-Ik8 In the arcade game Deal or No Deal, based on the TV game show of the same name, you have to try to keep your eyes on fast-moving cartoon suitcases as they are shuffled on the display. These guys used their phones to videotape the shuffling in slow motion so they could keep track…

What’s the secret to winning at Deal or No Deal?

T he easiest way is to present it. After half a decade in the televisual wilderness, Noel Edmonds has been given a £1.3m contract to continue presenting Channel 4’s latest and unexpected ratings hit, Deal or No Deal.

DOND is a brave and unusual gameshow, in that it has eschewed the concept of both game and show and chosen to rely instead on pure chance. Each of 22 contestants has a sealed box containing some money. They take it in turns to open boxes hiding different sums of money and decide – or, to be more accurate, guess – whether they contain more or less than their own containers. They are trying to get one that holds the top prize of £250,000. So far, so the game an infinite number of monkeys would come up with if they binned their typewriters and started throwing boxes around instead. But wait – here comes the Banker. He periodically asks the contestant whether he would like to sell his own unseen money for a certain price and the contestant must decide – or again, strictly speaking, guess – whether he should “Deal!” or “No deal!”.

You might think that seeking ways to win a game based on luck – a game devoid of any possibility that physical skill, mental agility or teamwork might skew the results in your favour – is futile. It is that kind of thinking, of course, that nearly lost us the war.

You can: make sure you are well fed and rested before participating, to ensure that, when you say “Deal!” to the banker, you do not mean “No deal!”, or vice versa. How many of us have lost the mastery of opposites through hunger or fatigue? It is a little-known fact that half the burnings of Bloody Mary were brought about by people who said Protestant when they meant Catholic because they’d been up all night starching ruffs and not eating.

Also, you can: practice at home, by throwing a pack of cards repeatedly into the air and guessing whether the ace of spades is going to land on the coffee table or not. Furthermore, you can: festoon yourself with four-leaf clovers, rabbit’s feet and number sevens. Good – and I cannot stress this enough – luck!

<p>The easiest way is to present it. After half a decade in the televisual wilderness, Noel Edmonds has been given a &#163;1.3m contract to continue presenting Channel 4's latest and unexpected ratings hit, Deal or No Deal. By <strong>Lucy Mangan</strong>.</p> ]]>