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September 09, 2019

Settlement Website, Phone Number Announced For Claims In Jackpot Lawsuit

A website and toll-free telephone number are now live for U.S. lottery players to contact if they think they can make a claim in a settlement stemming from a class-action lawsuit.

The settlement will allow refunds for the cost of tickets purchased in a small set of lottery drawings held from November 2005 to May 2013 in certain games, including the Hot Lotto game.

The only way that players can make a claim as part of the settlement is by going to the website at www.LotteryGameSettlement.com or calling 1-877-872-3816.

The claims process will run for 120 days, through Jan. 7, 2020. Players who don’t submit their claim forms by the deadline will be excluded and won’t be part of the settlement.

The claim form that players will need to file is available on the settlement website and can be completed online or downloaded. Players who download the form will need to fill it out and follow instructions to send it to a company that will review the claims.

The $4.3 million settlement in the case of Culler et al vs. the Multi-State Lottery Association (MUSL) will provide refunds to those with nonwinning lottery tickets linked to the lottery fraud case that centered on Eddie Tipton, an Iowa man who worked for years in information-security at MUSL.

The Iowa Lottery was not a party to the lawsuit, but the events of this week give us another chance to look back and take pride in the work we did along with that of other Iowa officials who led the investigation. That effort ultimately led to this point where there can be a settlement for affected players.

Please note that the Iowa Lottery is not involved in the settlement process and can’t help review, process or validate any player claims. Players who want to make a claim need to visit the settlement website or call the toll-free telephone number.

Once the claims process is completed, the court will review the settlement agreement again and make a final determination about the process that will follow.

The long-running lottery jackpot investigation case culminated in 2017 with guilty pleas from three men who admitted they illegally claimed prizes by rigging lottery drawings in five states. Eddie Tipton, the man at the center of the investigation, worked at MUSL, an organization within the lottery industry, and installed malicious computer code that allowed him to predict winning numbers in some lottery drawings.

Tipton ultimately pleaded guilty to three felony charges in Iowa and Wisconsin and was sentenced in August 2017 to up to 25 years in prison. He admitted that he conspired with friends and family to claim lottery prizes in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wisconsin. He also tried to claim a jackpot in Iowa, but it was not paid after the Iowa Lottery’s security questions went unanswered.

Tipton’s younger brother, Tommy Tipton, also pleaded guilty in the case, as did Tipton’s long-time friend, Robert Rhodes.

Burlington resident Dale Culler filed a lawsuit naming MUSL in connection with the rigged games. A Polk County District Court judge granted Culler’s request to seek damages on behalf of other lottery players in a class-action suit.

July 22, 2019

Settlement Reached In Lawsuit Stemming From Long-Running Jackpot Investigation Case

A settlement has been reached in a class-action lawsuit stemming from the long-running lottery jackpot investigation that ended with three men being sentenced after admitting that they cooperated to commit lottery fraud.

The Iowa Lottery was not a party to the lawsuit, but we view this as a moment to look back and take pride in our work along with that of other Iowa officials who led the investigation. That effort ultimately led us all to this point where there can be a settlement for affected players.

The $4.3 million settlement in the case of Culler et al vs. the Multi-State Lottery Association (MUSL) will provide refunds to those with nonwinning lottery tickets linked to the lottery fraud case that centered on Eddie Tipton, an Iowa man who worked for years in information-security at MUSL.

The settlement will allow refunds for the cost of tickets purchased in some lottery drawings between November 2005 and May 2013 in certain games sold around the country.

It’s our understanding that once the settlement reached by MUSL is approved by the court, a settlement website will be set up. That is the place where players who made purchases for the lottery drawings involved will be able to submit claims online or access claim forms that they can print out and submit by mail. We don’t have information yet about the settlement website, but we’ll share it when the details are provided to us.

Attorneys in the case say there will a mechanism for players who no longer have their tickets to file a claim.

The jackpot investigation case began with a lottery ticket purchased in December 2010 in Des Moines and culminated in 2017 with guilty pleas from three men who admitted they illegally claimed prizes by rigging lottery drawings in five states. Eddie Tipton, the man at the center of the investigation, worked at MUSL, an organization within the lottery industry, and installed malicious computer code that allowed him to predict winning numbers in some lottery drawings.

Tipton ultimately pleaded guilty to three felony charges in Iowa and Wisconsin and was sentenced in August 2017 to up to 25 years in prison. He had conspired with friends and family to claim lottery prizes in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wisconsin. He also tried to claim a lottery jackpot in Iowa, but it was not paid after the Iowa Lottery’s security questions went unanswered.

Tipton’s younger brother, Tommy Tipton, also pleaded guilty in the case, as did Tipton’s long-time friend, Robert Rhodes.

Burlington resident Dale Culler is among at least three people who filed lawsuits naming MUSL in connection with the rigged games. A Polk County District Court judge granted Culler’s request to seek damages on behalf of other lottery players in a class-action suit.

The facts behind the fun.

Two Warren County residents claim big lottery prizes

Patrick ‘Jason’ Stout won $100,000 from the Iowa Lottery. (Photo: Submitted photo/Iowa Lottery)

Two Warren County residents claimed lottery prizes this week of $100,000 and $30,000, respectively.

Patrick ‘Jason’ Stout of Norwalk claimed the fourth of nine top prizes of $100,000 available in the lottery’s “Little Black Game Book” scratch game, and Desiree Lagerquist of Carlisle claimed a $30,000 prize playing Hot Lotto ® .

Both Stout and Lagerquist claimed their prizes Monday at the lottery’s headquarters in Clive.

Stout said his lottery routine of buying a couple of scratch tickets every week at Git-N-Go, 702 Beardsley St. in Norwalk paid off in a big way.

“I’ve won $1,000 a couple of times, but would never imagine this amount of money coming my way,” Stout told lottery employees as he claimed his prize.

The 45-year-old said he bought his winning ticket Friday and scratched it off that night at home.

“Got to the Bingo game and all of the numbers came together. I couldn’t believe it,” Stout said. “I asked my wife to look at it, double-check it. She doesn’t play, so she doesn’t know what she’s looking for. So we ran up to the store. Ran it through the self-scanner and sure enough it was $100,000.”

Stout, who is a dump truck driver for a construction company in Altoona, said a portion of his lottery winnings will go toward bills. He said he also plans to add a garage to his house and take his daughter to a theme park in Florida.

“We’ve lived paycheck to paycheck, so this will definitely change our lives,” he said.

For Lagerquist, her ticket was just one number away from winning a big Hot Lotto jackpot last month. Her winning ticket matched the first five numbers, but missed the Hot Ball in the June 15 drawing to win a $30,000 prize. She bought her winning ticket at Casey’s, 1001 Iowa Highway 5 in Carlisle.

The winning numbers in that night’s $3.38 million jackpot were: 2-8-24-34-45 and Hot Ball 18. The game’s jackpot has been growing since January and has climbed to $4.48 million for Wednesday’s drawing. The game has an all-cash jackpot with withholding taxes paid, meaning that if the advertised jackpot is $4.48 million, the winner will receive a one-time lump-sum payment for that full amount.

Two Warren County residents claimed lottery prizes this week of $100,000 and $30,000, respectively. ]]>